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Time Follows from a Wish

  • Kelly Noel-SmithEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Studies in the Psychosocial book series (STIP)

Abstract

Kelly Noel-Smith develops a close reading of Freud showing how it is governance under the reality principle that provides each of us with a rhythm of engagement with the world from which comes our idea of time. She puts this into context in her scholarly review of four important processes regulated by the reality principle: refinding, remembering, mourning and loving another. She then examines Freud’s account of the endopsychic process, a topic rarely touched on in psychoanalytic literature, whereby we somehow observe and then project our inner workings. Noel-Smith persuasively argues that it was Freud’s view that this process creates the temporal frame through which we make our rhythmic explorations of the external world and, through this process, refind the temporarily absent mother rather than hallucinate her presence; grieve our losses so that we can form new attachments rather than become melancholic; and move from being in love to loving.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CambridgeUK

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