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In a “Justice” League of Their Own: Transmedia Storytelling and Paratextual Reinvention in LEGO’s DC Super Heroes

  • Lincoln GeraghtyEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

LEGO toys, media and associated merchandise contribute to a complex narrative network of LEGO texts, working in tandem to underscore the new storytelling strategy’s preeminence. In this chapter, author Lincoln Geraghty argues that LEGO’s animated series and video games are part of the LEGO Group’s strategy for creating brand synergy: By reinventing established canon through paratextual production, LEGO both creates new audiences and offers franchise partners space to retell and resell older characters and storylines. The author’s analysis of Batman demonstrates LEGO’s DC Super Heroes media mix: texts and paratexts, animation and films, toys and games, history and narrative merging across multiple continuities. This chapter thus highlights the interconnected nature of corporate production, media content creation and transmedia world-building in the contexts of character development.

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Filmography: Films Featuring LEGO Batman

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of PortsmouthPortsmouthUK

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