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Conclusions

  • Miroslaw Staron
Chapter

Abstract

This book introduced action research as a research methodology for software engineering research. It is one of many methodologies available today and is best suited for organizations centered around collaboration and knowledge co-creation between academia and industry. In the book, we introduced all phases of action research, compared it to the most similar research methodologies, and discussed how to document and report action research studies. In this final chapter, we focus on providing guidelines on where to go next. We look into the case where action research can be applied in multiple organizations and how to tackle collaborations with multiple organizations, by time-sharing the research time and activities.

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miroslaw Staron
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and EngineeringUniversity of GothenburgGothenburgSweden

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