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Comorbidity pp 115-138 | Cite as

Comorbid Eating Disorders

  • C. Laird BirminghamEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Anorexia nervosa is defined by persistent restriction of energy intake, intense fear and rumination about gaining weight, and disturbance in self-perceived weight or shape, which results in behaviour that prevents weight gain or results in weight loss.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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