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Public Sector Reform and the Quest for a Capable Public Service

  • Sergio Fernandez
Chapter
Part of the Executive Politics and Governance book series (EXPOLGOV)

Abstract

The ANC views the bureaucracy as an indispensable tool for transforming society and redressing the harm caused by apartheid. This chapter begins by discussing major administrative reforms undertaken in South Africa since 1994 to create an integrated, capable, effective, representative, and accountable public service that responds to the needs and interests of all South Africans. The discussion then turns to ongoing administrative deficiencies and challenges facing the public service, many of which represent striking continuities from the apartheid era. The chapter ends with a discussion of the limits of administrative reform.

Keywords

Bureaucracy Administrative reform Capacity Performance 

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Sergio Fernandez
    • 1
  1. 1.Indiana University BloomingtonBloomingtonUSA

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