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Addressing the Legacy of Apartheid

  • Sergio FernandezEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Executive Politics and Governance book series (EXPOLGOV)

Abstract

This chapter positions administrative reform and demographic transformation of the South African bureaucracy within the context of the ANC government’s efforts to address the legacy of apartheid. For nearly two decades, the ANC has pursued an ambitious and far-reaching policy agenda whose central thrust has been to undo the harm caused by apartheid by eliminating racial and gender inequality and reducing poverty, particularly among blacks. These policies are highly salient to historically disadvantaged groups, especially blacks, creating propitious conditions for representation of historically disadvantaged groups to improve bureaucratic performance. The discussion then turns to efforts to transform the public service into a representative bureaucracy and the demographic changes that have occurred within the public sector during the last two decades. The chapter concludes with a critique of transformation, including claims that it has eroded the capacity and performance of the public service.

Keywords

Apartheid Service delivery Affirmative action Transformation 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Indiana University BloomingtonBloomingtonUSA

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