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Contemporary Application of an Ancient Technique

  • Karel James Bouse
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines traditional shamanism and Neo-shamanism, citing their similarities and differences. It describes the technology and process of the shamanic journey and examines its apparent ability to integrate normal waking consciousness and the executive brain with the unconscious and the limbic system. The chapter includes precautions regarding using this ancient technology without the proper instruction and/or supervision and group environment and discusses Neo-shamanism as a cultural phenomena that is anomalous to both our current cultural paradigm and academic inquiry.

Keywords

Neo-shamanism Shamanism Shamanic journey Cultural dissonance 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karel James Bouse
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Esoteric PsychologyLoudonUSA

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