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Can Improvements Be Made to the Police Response?

  • Garth den Heyer
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides a basis for examining the police response to the occurrence of riots. The chapter presents a discussion on the public’s acceptance of and confidence in the police in the context of a riot and examines the influence that crowd psychology has on the police. The chapter also provides a review of the riot response tactics currently being used by the police and discusses the use of containment, dispersal, and negotiation and analyzes a case study of the New York Police Department’s approach to negotiated protest. The final section of the chapter summarizes the information contained in this book and examines a number of specific areas from which the police can move forward in their development of riot response strategies and tactics.

Keywords

Confidence in police Crowd psychology Riot tactics 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Garth den Heyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Arizona State UniversityPhoenixUSA

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