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VA Programs for Justice-Involved Veterans

  • Sean ClarkEmail author
  • Bessie Flatley
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the Veterans Justice Programs, through which the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs conducts outreach to justice-involved veterans and facilitates their access to treatment and other services. These programs are considered against the backdrop of historical trends in justice involvement among veterans, and the development and growth of Veteran-focused criminal justice programming such as Veterans Treatment Courts and Veteran-specific housing units in prisons and jails. The structure and functions of the Veterans Justice Programs are detailed, along with data showing their impacts on justice-involved Veterans’ access to mental health and substance use disorder treatment.

Keywords

Veterans Criminal justice U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Incarceration Treatment courts Homelessness Outreach Access to care 

Abbreviations

BJS

Bureau of Justice Statistics

CHALENG

Community Homelessness Assessment, Local Education and Networking Groups

FY

Fiscal Year

HCRV

Health Care for Reentry Veterans

MLP

Medical-Legal Partnership

VA

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

VHA

Veterans Health Administration

VJO

Veterans Justice Outreach

VJP

Veterans Justice Programs

VTC

Veterans Treatment Court

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Veterans Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Veterans AffairsLexington VA Medical Center (122-HP-LD)LexingtonUSA
  2. 2.Clinical Operations, VHA Homeless Programs, U.S. Department of Veterans AffairsPhiladelphiaUSA

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