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Mobile Crowdsensing in Healthcare Scenarios: Taxonomy, Conceptual Pillars, Smart Mobile Crowdsensing Services

  • Rüdiger PryssEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Neuroscience, Psychology and Behavioral Economics book series (SNPBE)

Abstract

Recently, new paradigms like crowdsensing emerged in the context of mobile technologies that promise to support researchers in life sciences and the healthcare domain in a new way. For example, by the use of smartphones, valuable data can be quickly gathered in everyday life and then easily compared to other crowd users, especially when taking environmental factors or sensor data additionally into account. In the context of chronic diseases, mobile technology can particularly help to empower patients in coping with their individual health situation more properly. However, to utilize the achievements of mobile technology in the aforementioned contexts is still challenging. Following this, the work at hand discusses two important and relevant aspects for mobile crowdsensing in healthcare scenarios. First, the status quo of mobile crowdsensing technologies and their relevant perspectives on healthcare scenarios are discussed. Second, salient aspects are presented, which can help researchers to conceptualize mobile crowdsensing to a more generic software toolbox that is able to utilize data gathered with smartphones and their built-in sensors in everyday life. The overall toolbox goal is the support of researchers to conduct studies or analyzes on this new and less understood kind of data source. On top of this, patients shall be empowered to demystify their individual health condition more properly when using the toolbox, especially by exploiting the wisdom of the crowd.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Databases and Information SystemsUlm UniversityUlmGermany

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