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Doubts, Assumptions, and Social Sciences and Psychology Today

  • Aaro Toomela
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Psychology book series (BRIEFSPSYCHOL)

Abstract

In this chapter it is demonstrated that three approaches to the four Assumptions can be distinguished in psychology. Modern qualitative pre-paradigmatic approach essentially takes all the four Assumptions negatively; mainstream paradigmatic quantitative psychology today agrees that external organized material world exists, but assumes that this world is knowable only in the limits of appearances. Finally, metaparadigmatic structural-systemic science, which was dominant in the pre-World-War-II continental Europe but faded away after the war, takes all the four assumptions positively: the external only material organized world exists and is knowable in principle beyond appearances.

Keywords

Modern qualitative psychology Mainstream quantitative psychology Structural-systemic psychology 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aaro Toomela
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Natural Sciences and HealthTallinn UniversityTallinnEstonia

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