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The New Paradigm in the Task of Direction-Coordination of Innovative Technological Projects in the Environment of INDUSTRY 4.0

  • M. Numan Durakbasa
  • Jorge M. BauerEmail author
  • Esteban Capuano
  • J. Martin Acosta
  • J. Carlos Diaz
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering book series (LNME)

Abstract

The Internet and the associated data highway have radically changed lifestyles and forms of production/services in a transcendent manner. Many authors characterize this qualitative change as a new industrial revolution. Exchange emails/information in electronic format and video conferences is already part of daily uses applied by vast sectors of the world population for the most varied purposes. Computers, tablets and cell phones are the access and interface nodes to this process. For several years now, Telepresence has allowed us to operate remote equipment more easily and monitor with online vision in order to control processes of different types that occur in almost any point of the global village from almost anywhere in the global village. INDUSTRY 4.0 has as its central objective the use of all these tools in an integrated manner and to reinforce a path of continuous improvement, increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of organizations.

The present work reflects the experience in two new aspects, opportunities and difficulties that arise with the new paradigms of the organization of teams for creative and participative workers. On the one hand, the difference between implementing Telepresence and not just telecontrol is analyzed. On the other hand, we present a new small software modules complementary to those already developed/implemented in our technological research team, that underpin a “Virtual Engineering Office” with its similarities and differences to the “Virtual Classroom”.

Keywords

Virtual Engineering Office Telepresence Home Office Concurrent Engineering Remote work 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Numan Durakbasa
    • 1
  • Jorge M. Bauer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Esteban Capuano
    • 2
  • J. Martin Acosta
    • 3
  • J. Carlos Diaz
    • 3
  1. 1.AuM, TU-WienViennaAustria
  2. 2.Robotic, UTN-FRBA Argentina, Depto IndustrialBuenos AiresArgentina
  3. 3.Robotic, University Palermo ArgentinaBuenos AiresArgentina

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