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Situation Analysis

  • Kiarash Aramesh
Chapter
Part of the Advancing Global Bioethics book series (AGBIO, volume 15)

Abstract

This chapter depicts a detailed picture of various role-players involved in Global Governance for Health Research. The best way to understand Global Governance for Health Research and how it works is knowing and analyzing the various categories of its role-players, their compositions, functions, and dynamics. These role-players, together, shape a network that is in charge of Global Governance for Health Research. In other words, the second chapter explores the existing situation and portrays the map of Global Governance for Health Research in the contemporary world. This chapter categorizes the role-payers into two main categories: (1) States and Intergovernmental Organizations, including influential states such as the United States and Intergovernmental Organizations such as the World Health Organization, the World bank, and UNESCO; (2) Non-State Role Players, including philanthropic organizations; non-state organizations such as the World Medical Association and the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences; and for-profit organizations. This chapter depicts how a global network is formed by the intertwined functions of these role-players.

Keywords

Intergovernmental Organizations Non-State Organizations Global Network Council of Europe World Health Organization The World Bank UNESCO The World Medical Association The Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kiarash Aramesh
    • 1
  1. 1.Edinboro University of PennsylvaniaEdinboroUSA

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