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Definition, Conceptual Analysis, and History

  • Kiarash Aramesh
Chapter
Part of the Advancing Global Bioethics book series (AGBIO, volume 15)

Abstract

This chapter provides a conceptual analysis of the key concepts involved in and related to Global Governance for Health Research, including Governance, Global Governance, Global Health Governance, and other key concepts such as institution, organization, and state. These key related concepts are involved in shaping the main conceptual framework that encompasses all the discussion and arguments. This chapter breaks down these ideas and discusses how they contribute to Global Governance for Health Research. The first chapter also depicts a brief history of the main ethical and theoretical development in the health research enterprise, especially after the 1940s when the modern health research enterprise, adopting double-blind, randomized clinical trials as the gold standard, experienced exponential growth and created numerous ethical concerns that necessitate ethical frameworks to deal with.

Keywords

Global governance Global Health governance Global governance for health Global governance for Health Research 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kiarash Aramesh
    • 1
  1. 1.Edinboro University of PennsylvaniaEdinboroUSA

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