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Benchmark Soils in Agro-ecological Regions

  • K. S. Anil KumarEmail author
  • K. S. Karthika
  • M. Lalitha
  • R. Srinivasan
  • Shivanand
  • K. Sujatha
  • K. M. Nair
  • R. Hegde
  • S. K. Singh
  • Bipin B. Mishra
Chapter
Part of the World Soils Book Series book series (WSBS)

Abstract

The benchmark soils in twenty agro-ecological regions of the country are briefly explained in this chapter using the established soil series to interpret soils, their physical, chemical characteristics, problems and potentials. This would be helpful in identifying the use of soil resource inventory and classification in optimal land use and production system. In fact, a benchmark soil is widely extensive, holds a key position in the soil classification system and is of special significance to farming, engineering or other uses and focuses on its agronomic concepts for wider acceptability of interpretations and for extrapolation of research data. It is representative of the most extensive soils in major land resource area or agro-ecological zone. This chapter highlights the benchmark soils in conducting soil correlation, standardization of legends, prediction of soil behaviour, agro-technology transfer and planning for further research in soil science and allied disciplines. However, further refinement in its applications using GIS tools is of priority.

Keywords

Benchmark soils Agro-ecological regions Soil series Soil classification Resource inventory Agro-technology transfer 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. S. Anil Kumar
    • 1
    Email author
  • K. S. Karthika
    • 1
  • M. Lalitha
    • 1
  • R. Srinivasan
    • 1
  • Shivanand
    • 1
  • K. Sujatha
    • 1
  • K. M. Nair
    • 1
  • R. Hegde
    • 1
  • S. K. Singh
    • 2
  • Bipin B. Mishra
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.ICAR-National Bureau of Soil Survey and Land Use PlanningBangaloreIndia
  2. 2.ICAR-National Bureau of Soil Survey and Land Use PlanningNagpurIndia
  3. 3.Bihar Agricultural UniversityBhagalpurIndia
  4. 4.Pedology and Land Use Planning, School of Natural Resources Management and Environmental SciencesHaramaya UniversityDire DawaEthiopia
  5. 5.International Union of Soil ScienceViennaAustria

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