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From Text to Hypertext: Electronic Literature in Latin America

  • Claire TaylorEmail author
Chapter
Part of the New Directions in Latino American Cultures book series (NDLAC)

Abstract

This Introduction starts with a discussion of the advent of digital technologies and their impact upon cultural and literary norms and formats. It then scrutinises the relationship between digital culture studies and cultural studies, and advocates for a critical digital culture studies, which involves a potential recuperation of the leftist underpinnings of cultural studies. In so doing, the introduction posits a three-fold approach, combining aesthetics, technologics, and ethics, understanding digital literature as, simultaneously, making use of technological affordances without being determined by them; as building on prior literary traditions without being bound by them; and as providing a critical stance on contemporary socio-economic conditions, all the while being aware of its own imbrication in them. The Introduction then examines the use of intertextual and metatextual references in the selected authors, and their critique of the material conditions that underpin the technologies they employ.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Modern Languages and CulturesUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK

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