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Addressing Social Outcomes in Land and Water Management for Global Wine Regions

  • Erin UptonEmail author
  • Max Nielsen-Pincus
Chapter

Abstract

Land use planning and water management decisions impact both social and environmental sustainability. In wine-producing regions, preserving industry goals and natural resources like land and water can produce trade-offs that impact the social sustainability of those regions. This chapter draws on two case studies to illustrate how land use planning and water management decisions are impacting social sustainability outcomes in the wine regions of the Western Cape of South Africa and the Napa Valley in California. Social challenges for each case study’s wine industry range from shortages of affordable housing to economic empowerment of disadvantaged labourers. The land and water management in each wine region is discussed, as are the social outcomes of such decisions.

Keywords

Land use planning Water management Natural resources Governance 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Environmental Science and ManagementPortland State UniversityPortlandUSA

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