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Overview of Infectious Diseases of Concern to Dental Practitioners: Other Viral Infections

  • Lisa D’Affronte
  • Christina L. PlatiaEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Like bacteria and other blood-borne pathogens, viruses, and the diseases, their causes are also of particular concern to the healthcare provider. Healthcare workers are at increased risk for numerous infections which can be transmitted via exposure to blood or various bodily fluids or even through airborne means. Many of these viruses are very contagious, and some of them have no vaccine to aid in their prevention. When vaccines do exist, all healthcare providers should be current on all recommended vaccinations for employment in the healthcare setting. Healthcare providers should also consistently follow standard precautions whenever possible to minimize their exposure risk. Examples of types of other viral infections discussed in this chapter include many subtypes of the family of herpesviruses (including herpes simplex 1 and 2, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, and Kapsosi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus), the measles virus, and human papillomavirus.

Keywords

Viruses Viral diseases Herpesviruses Herpes simplex viruses HSV-1 HSV-2 VZV CMV HSHV Cytomegalovirus Shingles Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus Measles Rubeola HPV Human papilloma virus 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of General DentistrySchool of Dentistry, University of MarylandBaltimoreUSA

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