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Overview of Infectious Diseases of Concern to Dental Practitioners: Blood-Borne Pathogens

  • Lisa D’AffronteEmail author
  • Christina L. Platia
Chapter

Abstract

Blood-borne pathogens are of particular concern to the healthcare provider as they can be easily transmitted in the healthcare setting. This can happen due to improper disinfection of instruments and surfaces, or through parenteral exposure. With the proper use of standard precautions, including proper technique handling sharps, this can be avoided. Of particular concern is exposure to HIV, Hepatitis C, and Hepatitis B, for which there is a vaccine. All healthcare workers deemed at risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens should receive this vaccination. These diseases are manageable with proper detection and treatment. HIV is not cureable but can be controlled to a level that a patient can expect to live a full, healthy life. Hepatitis C and B can spontaneously resolve after an acute infection, but most people develop a chronic infection that if left untreated can lead to severe liver damage and even death. HIV and hepatitis continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the world, particularly in developing countries.

Keywords

Blood-borne pathogens Standard precautions Surface disinfection HIV Hepatitis C Hepatitis B Parenteral Vaccine 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of General DentistrySchool of Dentistry, University of MarylandBaltimoreUSA

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