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Dynamics of Deformation-to-Fracture Transition Based on Wave Theory

  • Sanichiro YoshidaEmail author
  • David R. Didie
  • Tomohiro Sasaki
  • Shun Ashina
  • Shun Takahashi
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

This paper discusses fracture from the viewpoint of wave dynamics derived from a recent field theory. Based on a fundamental physical principle, the field theory describes deformation and fracture on the same basis. It characterizes deformation as a wave phenomenon where the spatiotemporal oscillatory behavior of the displacement field initiated by an external load is transferred through the material as a sinusoidal wave carrying the stress energy. Fracture is characterized as the final stage of deformation where the wave becomes solitary representing strain concentration and stops carrying the stress energy. Fracture always occurs along the strain concentration. The transitional behavior of the wave dynamics can be visualized as a change in the optical interferometric fringe pattern generated by the optical technique known as the Electronic Speckle-Pattern interferometry. Finite element analysis has been conducted to explain the experimentally observed behaviors and explore the mechanism of transition from to fracture.

Keywords

Fracture dynamics Deformation dynamics Deformation wave Optical interferometry 

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Copyright information

© Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sanichiro Yoshida
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • David R. Didie
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tomohiro Sasaki
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shun Ashina
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shun Takahashi
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry and PhysicsSoutheastern Louisiana UniversityHammondUSA
  2. 2.Department of EngineeringNiigata UniversityNiigataJapan

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