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Experimental Path Loss Models Comparison and Localization of Wireless Endoscopic Capsule in the Ultra-Wideband Frequency Band

  • Sofia Perez-SimborEmail author
  • Martina Barbi
  • Mehrab Ramzan
  • Xiao Fang
  • Concepcion Garcia-Pardo
  • Narcis Cardona
  • Qiong Wang
  • Niels Neumann
  • Dirk Plettemeier
Conference paper
  • 33 Downloads
Part of the EAI/Springer Innovations in Communication and Computing book series (EAISICC)

Abstract

Ultra-Wideband (UWB) frequency band is becoming an alternative for the implanted RF link in Wireless Body Area Networks (WBAN). Previous works on WBAN and in the UWB frequency band study the channel characterization, where the effect of the antenna has been considered as a part of it. Nevertheless, in WBAN this effect is highly relevant and often underestimated. This work presents an experimental channel modeling of lossy human body tissue with one in-body antenna and two different on-body antennas, omnidirectional and directive antennas, for the UWB frequency band. The UWB frequency band has some advantages for some medical devices such as the Wireless Capsule Endoscopy (WCE) which has a large bandwidth and low power requirements. Thus, in this work, the channel models obtained are used to evaluate the performance of RSS-based localization of the capsule inside the lossy tissue during endoscopy.

Keywords

Wireless body area networks (WBAN) On-body antenna In-body antenna Phantom Ultra-wideband (UWB) Wireless capsule endoscope (WCE) Gastrointestinal Channel modeling Path loss Localization Vivaldi antenna 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research is supported by “WiBEC” (Wireless In-Body Environment) project funded by the European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement No 675353.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sofia Perez-Simbor
    • 1
    Email author
  • Martina Barbi
    • 1
  • Mehrab Ramzan
    • 2
  • Xiao Fang
    • 2
  • Concepcion Garcia-Pardo
    • 1
  • Narcis Cardona
    • 1
  • Qiong Wang
    • 2
  • Niels Neumann
    • 2
  • Dirk Plettemeier
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Telecommunications and Multimedia Applications (iTEAM)Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV)ValènciaSpain
  2. 2.Communication LaboratoryTU DresdenDresdenGermany

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