Advertisement

The Peer Observation: “Mentore” Project at University of Palermo

  • Marcella Cannarozzo
  • Pierluigi GalloEmail author
  • Alida Lo Coco
  • Bartolomeo Megna
  • Pasquale Musso
  • Onofrio Scialdone
Chapter
Part of the Knowledge Management and Organizational Learning book series (IAKM, volume 8)

Abstract

During the last 6 years at the University of Palermo, a group of academics has been involved in a project called “MENTORE” (“Modifying and ENhancing Teaching through peer Observation and Reflections with Experts.”) The objectives of the project are to help teachers improve their teaching, through the help of two mentors; to experiment new approaches in pilot courses to extend, if useful, to other ones; and to change the traditional model of academic teaching based on one single teacher with the class to go toward a model where there is a group of teachers working together in search of improvements. All the participants of the MENTORE project attend to lectures/workshops on teaching and learning and participate in meetings where they share experiences and ideas. In the program, each participant has two mentors who help him or her to improve the quality of his or her teaching. The two mentors are other academics who participate in the program. Indeed, each participant is both mentor and mentee during the same year. Mentors follow some of the lectures of the mentee, meet the students in the final part of the course in order to collect their opinion, and, finally, meet the mentee in order to discuss the actions to carry out for improving the quality of his or her teaching. This chapter describes the aforementioned peer observation practice adopted at the University of Palermo and focuses on the role of mentors describing their activities during the peer observation process.

Keywords

Pair mentorship Peer observation Peer feedback 

Notes

Acknowledgments

All the participants (see https://www.unipa.it/progetti/progetto-mentore/) to the MENTORE project are gratefully acknowledged for their enthusiastic contribution to the development of the project.

References

  1. Arbos, R. V., & Ponsa, P. (2011). Positive effect of increasing feedback for student self-adjustment of learning habits. Journal of Technology and Science Education, 1, 38–48.Google Scholar
  2. Berk, R. (2005). A survey of 12 strategies to measure teaching effectiveness. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 17, 48–62.Google Scholar
  3. Berk, R. A., Naumann, P. L., & Appling, S. E. (2004). Beyond student ratings: Peer observation of classroom and clinical teaching. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 1(1), 1–26. Google Scholar
  4. Centre for Teaching Support & Innovation. (2017). Peer observation of teaching: Effective practices. Toronto, ON: Centre for Teaching Support & Innovation, University of Toronto.Google Scholar
  5. Felisatti, E., Cannarozzo, M., Pennisi, S., & Scialdone, O. (2020). Manuscript in preparation. Google Scholar
  6. Fernandez, C. E., & Yu, J. (2007). Peer review of teaching. Journal of Chiropractic Education, 21, 154–161.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Gosling, D. (2002). Models of peer observation of teaching. Generic Centre: Learning and Teaching Support Network. Retrieved, 8, 08.Google Scholar
  8. Lomas, L., & Kinchin, I. (2006). Developing a peer observation program with university teachers. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 18, 204–214.Google Scholar
  9. Martinez, F., Taut, S., & Schaaf, K. (2016). Classroom observation for evaluating and improving teaching: An international perspective. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 49, 15–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Trujillo, J. M., DiVall, M. V., Barr, J., Gonyeau, M., Van Amburgh, J. A., Matthews, S. J., & Qualters, D. (2008). Development of a peer teaching-assessment program and a peer observation and evaluation tool. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 72, 147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcella Cannarozzo
    • 1
  • Pierluigi Gallo
    • 1
    Email author
  • Alida Lo Coco
    • 1
  • Bartolomeo Megna
    • 1
  • Pasquale Musso
    • 2
  • Onofrio Scialdone
    • 1
  1. 1.Università degli Studi di PalermoPalermoItaly
  2. 2.Department of Educational Sciences, Psychology, CommunicationUniversity of Studies of Bari “Aldo Moro”BariItaly

Personalised recommendations