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General Concepts and Historical Notes

  • Nicolò Bertozzi
  • GianLuigi Lago
  • Edoardo Raposio
Chapter

Abstract

Migraine headache (MH) is a common disabling disorder affecting 1.7–4% of the adult population. Throughout the medical literature, various theories can be found attempting to identify its etiology. However, only nowadays the extracranial origin of MH came to be regarded as the leading theory behind MH following the works of Guyuron et al. and other independent groups, which demonstrated that chronic compression to the terminal branches of trigeminal nerve caused by surrounding structures (e.g., muscles, vessels, and fascial bands) was responsible for provoking MH attacks. And therefore, MH trigger deactivation surgeries started being performed in different cutting-edge centers all over the word with success rate ranging from 68 to 95%. Even more recently, the “vascular theory” emerged as the leading cause of terminal branches of trigeminal nerve irritation.

Keywords

Migraine headache Migraine tension-type headache Migraine headache attack Migraine deactivation surgery Migraine trigger point Minimally invasive surgery 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicolò Bertozzi
    • 1
    • 2
  • GianLuigi Lago
    • 1
    • 2
  • Edoardo Raposio
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Plastic Surgery Division, Department of Medicine and SurgeryUniversity of ParmaParmaItaly
  2. 2.Cutaneous, Mini-invasive, Regenerative and Plastic Surgery UnitParma University HospitalParmaItaly

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