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How to Develop the Humanistic Dimension in Business and Management Higher Education?

  • Almudena EizaguirreEmail author
  • Leire Alcaniz
  • María García-Feijoo
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Management Science book series (MANAGEMENT SC.)

Abstract

Society faces the challenge of achieving sustainable development in the economic, social and environmental spheres. To achieve this, education in business schools has an important role when it comes to training future main actors of the political, economic and institutional decisions. This chapter proposes two complementary courses of action. On the one hand, it is important to educate for humanism, and, at the same time, this cannot be achieved without educating in a humanistic way. To educate for humanistic management, three approaches are presented: to question the prevalent economist paradigm; to incorporate theoretical contents around humanistic management in the curriculum; and to encourage students to experiment the humanistic dimension and to be connected with reality. In order to educate in a humanistic way, every agent and process in the university must be coherent with the humanistic principles and represent an example of them.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Almudena Eizaguirre
    • 1
    Email author
  • Leire Alcaniz
    • 1
  • María García-Feijoo
    • 1
  1. 1.Deusto Business SchoolUniversity of DeustoBilbaoSpain

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