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Effect of Ambient Light on Mobile Interaction

  • Zhanna SarsenbayevaEmail author
  • Niels van Berkel
  • Weiwei Jiang
  • Danula Hettiachchi
  • Vassilis Kostakos
  • Jorge Goncalves
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11748)

Abstract

In this work we investigate the effect of ambient light on performance during mobile interaction. We evaluate three conditions of ambient light – normal light, dimmed light, normal light while wearing sunglasses. Our results show that wearing sunglasses and dimmed light negatively affect reaction time, while dimmed light negatively affects accuracy performance in target acquisition tasks. We also show that wearing sunglasses increases memorising time in visual search tasks. Our study contributes to the growing body of research on the effects of different situational impairments on mobile interaction.

Keywords

Mobile interaction Situational visual impairments Ambient light 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work is partially funded by a Samsung GRO grant, and the ARC Discovery Project DP190102627. We also thank Silan Li for her help during data collection.

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhanna Sarsenbayeva
    • 1
    Email author
  • Niels van Berkel
    • 2
  • Weiwei Jiang
    • 1
  • Danula Hettiachchi
    • 1
  • Vassilis Kostakos
    • 1
  • Jorge Goncalves
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.University College LondonLondonUK

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