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Religious History: Spirit Poured Out on All Flesh

  • Eric MullisEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Performance Philosophy book series (PPH)

Abstract

This chapter advances a historical investigation of ecstatic Protestantism. It discusses the Camisard prophets, the Shakers, the Great Awakening described by Jonathan Edwards, and the first generation of American Pentecostalism. The biographies of Ann Lee, Charles Fox Parham, and William Seymour are used to illustrate the institutionally destabilizing power of ecstatic experience, an epistemological problem concerning the cause of ecstatic states, and ritual norms that frame such states. Mullis discusses the theology that informed early understandings of divine gifts—such as ecstatic dancing, glossolalia, and faith healing—which remain relevant in contemporary contexts. The chapter concludes by examining a biblically informed understanding of ritual reenactment and the manner in which ecstatic experience is understood in terms of specific soteriological, eschatological, and pneumatological beliefs.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Queens University of CharlotteCharlotteUSA

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