Advertisement

Millennialism

  • Catherine WessingerEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

“Millennialism,” the belief in an imminent transition to a collective salvation, which is either heavenly or earthly or both, takes various permutations that affect the trajectory of a movement. Common patterns of millennialism, which are not mutually exclusive, may be discerned by cross-cultural study.

References

  1. Baird, Robert D. 1971. Category formation and the history of religions. The Hague: Mouton.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Cohn, Norman. 1962. Medieval millenarianism: Its bearing on the comparative study of millenarian movements. In Millennial dreams in action: Essays in comparative study, ed. Sylvia A. Thrupp, 31–43. The Hague: Mouton.Google Scholar
  3. Ellwood, Robert. 2000. Nazism as a millennialist movement. In Millennialism, persecution, and violence: Historical cases, ed. Catherine Wessinger, 241–260. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Hall, John R. 2004. Gone from the promised land: Jonestown and American cultural history. New York: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  5. Landes, Richard. 2011. Heaven on earth: The varieties of the millennial experience. New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Laycock, Joseph P. 2015. The seer of Bayside: Veronica Lueken and the struggle to define Catholicism. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Lowe, Scott. 2000. Western millennial ideology goes east: The Taiping revolution and Mao’s great leap forward. In Millennialism, persecution, and violence: Historical cases, ed. Catherine Wessinger, 220–240. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Moore, Rebecca. 2009. Understanding Jonestown and Peoples Temple. Westport: Praeger.Google Scholar
  9. Pesantubbee, Michelene E. 2000. From vision to violence: The wounded knee massacre. In Millennialism, persecution, and violence: Historical cases, ed. Catherine Wessinger, 62–81. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Reader, Ian. 2000. Religious violence in contemporary Japan: The case of Aum Shinrikyo. Richmond: Curzon Press.Google Scholar
  11. Redles, David. 2005. Hitler’s millennial reich. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  12. ———. 2011. National socialist millennialism. In The Oxford handbook of millennialism, ed. Catherine Wessinger, 529–548. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Robbins, Thomas, and Dick Anthony. 1995. Sects and violence: Factors enhancing the volatility of marginal religious movements. In Armageddon in Waco: Critical perspectives on the Branch Davidian conflict, ed. Stuart A. Wright, 236–259. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  14. Rosenfeld, Jean E. 2011. Nativist millennialism. In The Oxford handbook of millennialism, ed. Catherine Wessinger, 89–109. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Salter, Richard C. 2000. Time, authority, and ethics in the Khmer Rouge: Elements of the millennial vision in year zero. In Millennialism, persecution, and violence: Historical cases, ed. Catherine Wessinger, 281–298. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Sarno, Charles, and Helen Shoemaker. 2016. Church, sect, or cult? The curious case of Harold Camping’s family radio and the May 21 movement. Nova Religio 19 (3): 6–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Steyn, Christine. 2000. Millenarian tragedies in South Africa: The Xhosa cattle-killing movement and the Bulhoek massacre. In Millennialism, persecution, and violence: Historical cases, ed. Catherine Wessinger, 185–202. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Stone, Jon R. 2011. Nineteenth- and twentieth-century American millennialisms. In The Oxford handbook of millennialism, ed. Catherine Wessinger, 492–514. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Underwood, Grant. 2000. Millennialism, persecution, and violence: The Mormons. In Millennialism, persecution, and violence: Historical cases, ed. Catherine Wessinger, 43–61. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Walliss, John. 2005. Making sense of the Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God. Nova Religio 9 (1): 49–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Wessinger, Catherine. 2000a. How the millennium comes violently: From Jonestown to Heaven’s Gate. New York: Seven Bridges Press.Google Scholar
  22. ———. 2000b. The interacting dynamics of millennial beliefs, persecution, and violence. In Millennialism, persecution, and violence: Historical cases, ed. Catherine Wessinger, 3–39. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press.Google Scholar
  23. ———. 2011a. Millennialism in cross-cultural perspective. In The Oxford handbook of millennialism, ed. Catherine Wessinger, 3–24. New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. ———, comp. 2011b. Millennial glossary. In The Oxford handbook of millennialism, ed. Catherine Wessinger, 717–23. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  25. ———, comp. 2016. Branch Davidians (1981–2006). World religions and spirituality project. October 10. https://wrldrels.org/2016/02/25/branch-davidians-2/. Accessed 1 Apr 2019.
  26. ———, 2018. Collective martyrdom and religious suicide: The Branch Davidians and Heaven’s gate. In Martyrdom, self-sacrifice, and self-immolation: Religious perspectives on suicide, ed. Margo Kitts, 54–84. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  27. Wojcik, Daniel. 2011. Avertive apocalypticism. In The Oxford handbook of millennialism, ed. Catherine Wessinger, 66–88. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  28. Zeller, Benjamin E. 2014. Heaven’s gate: America’s UFO religion. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Loyola University New OrleansNew OrleansUSA

Personalised recommendations