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Messianism

  • Anna AkasoyEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Starting from the activist and quietist views of the three large monotheisms, this chapter traces conceptions of messianism. It then proceeds to the secular context and addresses historical examples of messianism, female messiahs, and the way messianism has involved contemporary political leaders.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Islamic Intellectual HistoryThe Graduate Center, CUNYNew YorkUSA

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