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Knowledge

  • Heike PaulEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Knowledge formations can be organized and examined in different typologies, such as that of implicit and explicit knowledge. Knowledge production is historically linked to colonialist world-making and needs to be understood and addressed in its situatedness.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of English and American StudiesFriedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-NürnbergErlangenGermany

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