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The Disclosure of Criminal Records to Employers

  • Terry Thomas
  • Kevin Bennett
Chapter

Abstract

The criminal record disclosure system has grown incrementally over the last thirty years. Existing laws have been altered and amended and other laws are added on in an ad hoc fashion in response to case law and parts of the European Convention on Human Rights. The whole system now arguably needs reviewing and simplifying if anyone is to fully understand it. Starting in Home Office circulars, it is now a tangle of legislation described by The Times newspaper as ‘complicated and arcane’ (The Times Editorial, 31 January 2019). It is on to this Kafkaesque system of criminal record disclosures that the equally difficult-to-follow arrangements have been added to disclose ‘non-conviction information’.

Keywords

Criminal records disclosure Criminal Records Bureau Disclosure and Barring Service Police Act 1997 Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terry Thomas
    • 1
  • Kevin Bennett
    • 2
  1. 1.Leeds Beckett UniversityLeedsUK
  2. 2.University of SunderlandSunderlandUK

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