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The Notion of Risk-Taking

  • Jens O. ZinnEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Critical Studies in Risk and Uncertainty book series (CRSTRU)

Abstract

The notion of risk-taking is used inconsistently in risk studies. This chapter explores the notions of risk behaviour and voluntary risk-taking to define risk-taking as an activity, which results from the negotiations, conflicts and identity work people conduct when position themselves in a structurally and culturally shaped social world. The chapter suggests that in contrast to other concepts, risk-taking requires a minimal awareness of that one engages in an activity with potentially harmful effects. This chapter provides the definition of risk-taking which is the basis for the empirical and conceptual work of the chapters to follow.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

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