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Policy Intersections in Education for the Gifted and Talented in China and Denmark

  • Annette RasmussenEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies on Chinese Education in a Global Perspective book series (CEGP)

Abstract

Inclusion and excellence are two major keywords in global education policies. Sometimes they are even combined when policies aim to cater for the needs of those considered excluded because they are particularly talented. This has been the case in Denmark since 2011, when talent development in the educational system was launched as an explicit policy objective. While setting up special programmes for the gifted and talented is a recent phenomenon in the Nordic countries (known for their strong traditions for an un-streamed school), China has had middle school gifted education classes for more than three decades. This chapter explores what assumptions about the gifted and talented are implied, when policymakers aim to identify them and set up special programmes for such student groups.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Learning and PhilosophyAalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark

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