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Corruption in Sport Governing Bodies

  • Wladimir Andreff
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Pivots in Sports Economics book series (PAPISE)

Abstract

This chapter covers corruption cases where corruptors or corruptees are executive members of sport governing bodies. They emerge when awarding mega-sporting events or appointing someone to a significant position in a sport governing body. Information is covered and reminded as regard the IOC and the Olympics, FIFA and the soccer World Cup and other sport governing bodies (IAAF, CPBL). All cases reveal an issue of deficient governance which requires reforms to combat more efficiently corruption in sport.

Keywords

Corruption Sport governing bodies Olympics International Olympic Committee FIFA World Cup Mega-sporting events Governance 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wladimir Andreff
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre d’Economie de la SorbonneUniversity Paris 1 Panthéon-SorbonneParisFrance

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