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Emotions Are Motivating

  • Peter D. MacIntyreEmail author
  • Jessica Ross
  • Richard Clément
Chapter

Abstract

The role of emotions in language learning motivation has been underappreciated. In this chapter we review basic emotion theory in support of the proposition that emotions just might be the most important motivation system that human beings possess. At their core, emotions are multifaceted, combining subjective feelings with biological, purposive, and expressive dimensions. In particular, the differentiation of the functions of positive and negative emotions and the concept of emotion schemas help account for the specific ways in which emotions motivate language learning. Two emotions that have been studied, language anxiety and enjoyment, are indicative of the powerful role emotions play in second language learning and communication. Emotions are a dynamic base that contributes significantly to the creation and maintenance of language motivation.

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter D. MacIntyre
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jessica Ross
    • 1
  • Richard Clément
    • 2
  1. 1.Cape Breton UniversitySydneyCanada
  2. 2.University of OttawaOttawaCanada

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