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Complexity Theory and L2 Motivation

  • Phil HiverEmail author
  • Mostafa Papi
Chapter

Abstract

Hiver and Papi explore the contribution of applying complexity theory (CDST) to theoretical and empirical work on L2 motivation. Through a review of relevant conceptual tools and principles of complexity, the chapter first examines the ways in which a foundation in CDST has informed theory and practice in L2 motivation. These principles are illustrated through examples of recent and ongoing research from a dynamic and situated perspective. Extending this discussion to methodological considerations, the chapter details the utility of CDST as an aid to designing L2 motivation research that prioritizes adaptive and developmental processes. Rounding off the chapter is a proposal for guiding principles for future L2 motivation research designed to correspond with the conceptual tools and principles introduced at the outset of the chapter.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Florida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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