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Researching L2 Motivation: Past, Present and Future

  • Ema UshiodaEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This concluding chapter examines the ‘how’ of language learning motivation research–that is, the methodological approaches, research designs, and tools of inquiry used to investigate motivation for language learning. The purpose of the chapter is to survey the diverse range of approaches to researching L2 (second language) motivation, with reference to particular types of study and particular research traditions. The chapter does not provide a practical “how to” guide for specific methods of inquiry, but aims instead to offer a critical analysis of strengths, limitations and challenges associated with different approaches to investigating language learning motivation. As reflected in its title, the chapter takes a broadly historical perspective and reviews how research designs have evolved and diversified over the decades in line with theoretical developments, broader research trends, and advances in technology. It discusses recent methodological innovations in the field, identifies current research challenges and issues, and outlines considerations for researching language learning motivation in the future.

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of WarwickCoventryUK

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