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From Integrative Motivation to Directed Motivational Currents: The Evolution of the Understanding of L2 Motivation over Three Decades

  • Zoltán DörnyeiEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter offers an overview of the evolving understanding of the construct of L2 motivation since the 1990s. The starting date marks a time when a new generation of motivation researchers embarked on the expansion of the influential motivation theory that had been developed by Robert Gardner and his colleagues in Canada, with a view of making it compatible with educational considerations as well as with advances in mainstream motivational psychology. Since then, L2 motivation research has been undergoing almost unceasing development, characterised by emerging new theories, evolving perspectives and innovative approaches. The overview offered in this chapter focuses on four main factors that have played a key role in energising the various theoretical initiatives, and discusses how their objectives became materialised over the decades.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of NottinghamNottinghamUK

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