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Motivation in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) Research

  • David LasagabasterEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) programmes are burgeoning due to the increasing importance attached to foreign language learning in many diverse education systems. In the European context schools are offering CLIL courses in the belief that this kind of approach is the best way not only to improve students’ command of foreign languages, but also to increase both teachers’ and students’ motivation to learn foreign languages. However, different voices warn that much of the research undertaken so far suffers from methodological weaknesses that need to be identified and overcome in future studies. With this in mind, this chapter intends to provide a review of the main studies on the impact of CLIL on motivation in order to map out a future research agenda.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This chapter falls within the work carried out in the following research projects: FFI2016-79377-P (Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness) and IT904-16 (Department of Education, University and Research of the Basque Government).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of the Basque Country UPV/EHUVItoria-GasteizSpain

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