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Conclusion: The “Making of” “Middle-earth Aotearoa”

  • Jan CroninEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Adaptation and Visual Culture book series (PSADVC)

Abstract

“Making of” The Lord of the Rings (and The Hobbit) texts present the acme of the cultural risks and investments charted in The Quiet Man and Gone with the Wind “Making of” sites. In the “Making of” texts explored in this chapter, an existing nexus of people, past and place is effaced to accommodate, in the land itself, the inscription and instantiation of a trans-cultural imaginary. “Making of” texts depict the “branding” of Aotearoa New Zealand as “Middle-earth” through an adaptive process, where that adaptive status is obscured to promote an organic revelation of Aotearoa New Zealand as found “Middle-earth.” Cronin concludes with the question of ethical participation in the “Making of” genre, seeing the matter as commensurate with how we think about adaptation itself.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of HumanitiesUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

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