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Theorising Political Economy in Southeast Asia

  • Shahar HameiriEmail author
  • Lee Jones
Chapter
  • 39 Downloads
Part of the Studies in the Political Economy of Public Policy book series (PEPP)

Abstract

This chapter discusses contending theoretical approaches to political economy relevant to the study of Southeast Asia and outlines the approach taken in the rest of this book. After introducing the basic notion of “political economy”, we outline three contending approaches used to understand it: Weberianism, historical institutionalism, and the Murdoch School.

Keywords

Political economy Theory Developmental state Historical institutionalism Murdoch School 

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© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Political Science and International StudiesThe University of QueenslandSt LuciaAustralia
  2. 2.School of Politics and International RelationsQueen Mary University of LondonLondonUK

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