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The Hermeneutics of Givenness

  • Jean-Luc MarionEmail author
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Part of the Contributions to Hermeneutics book series (CONT HERMEN, volume 7)

Abstract

Hermeneutics is very often taken for granted: every statement, and by derivation, every fact or phenomenon, would have to be interpreted. This remains obvious, indeed. But, precisely because it looks obvious, we cannot avoid the question asking why it is so. And an answer may remain puzzling, as we could imagine that any correct formulation or description would need no additional commentary to be understood univocally. This could even define the utility of a correct use of language. However, notwithstanding the array of philosophical emendations of daily language (by grammar as well as semantics), we have all experienced that this univocity remains beyond our reach. Here, we suggest that hermeneutics becomes compulsory because the intuition of what gives itself overflows most of the times, if not always, what shows itself and what can be explained or understood by concepts. The excess of the intuition on the concept allows, more than that, asks for a hermeneutics. Therefore, far from a phenomenology of givenness forbidding hermeneutics, it opens its broad and unescapable field.

Keywords

Phenomenology Hermeneutics Givenness Intuition Interpretation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Chicago Divinity SchoolChicagoUSA

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