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Ilm

  • Kalyani Unkule
Chapter
Part of the Spirituality, Religion, and Education book series (SPRE)

Abstract

This chapter seeks to define relationships, starting with the correlation between scientific advancement and development that is embedded in our social psychology and educational discourse. Next, ideas and traditions in Hinduism are discussed to clarify the terms “religion” and “spirituality”. Yoga is discussed as a pedagogical practice aimed at holistic development, and the ways in which it has been adopted in formal education and diplomacy are observed. The discussion on yoga opens the door to delve into alternative ways of knowing. Here, approaches from Daoism, Buddhism, and Confucianism are found to be immensely relevant and inspiring. Another important aim of this chapter is to explore how a departure from the early influence of theology influenced the beginnings of rationality-based positivist science. In Chap.  2 I called on universities to turn their gaze inwards to grasp the causes behind current challenges. Reassessment of dominant practices of knowledge creation and dissemination in light of “other ways of knowing” yields rich insight in this direction. The chapter title “Ilm” is an admission that other ways of knowing exist.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kalyani Unkule
    • 1
  1. 1.O. P. Jindal Global UniversityDelhiIndia

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