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The School-to-Prison Pipeline

  • Lee-Anne Gray
Chapter

Abstract

The school-to-prison pipeline (STPP) is the most severe example of Educational Trauma and is also an example of: Spectral, In-Situ, Ex-Situ, and Social-Ecological Educational Traumas. It is a systematic method by which schools facilitate the movement of minority youth (i.e., Black, Latinx, and/or LGBTQ+ students) into the prison-industrial complex. The STPP represents the height of “at-risk” profiling gone awry. It is a set of systematic processes and programs that channel oppressed students into a parallel universe that Rios (2011) calls the Youth Correctional Complex. Along with the prison-industrial complex, it ensures minority youth wind up in “social death”. The denial of this as a method of genocide against marginalized people places the United States in the 10th of 10 stages of genocide (see Epilogue).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lee-Anne Gray
    • 1
  1. 1.The Connect GroupToluca LakeUSA

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