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Introduction

  • Lee-Anne Gray
Chapter

Abstract

Educational Trauma is the inadvertent and unintentional perpetration and perpetuation of harm in schools. The harm exists on a spectrum from mild to severe, and there are four different kinds of Educational Trauma: Spectral Educational Trauma; In-Situ Educational Trauma; Ex-Situ Educational Trauma; and Social-Ecological Educational Trauma. Eugenics practices are thriving in schools and feed the school-to-prison pipeline, which is the most extreme example of Educational Trauma. The complexities of this phenomenon are introduced in this volume.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lee-Anne Gray
    • 1
  1. 1.The Connect GroupToluca LakeUSA

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