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Equality, Identity and Impartiality

  • David Bromell
Chapter

Abstract

In liberal democratic societies, there is broad agreement that human persons are of equal moral worth and that we should treat one another as equals. Bromell notes that we do not agree, however, on what it means to treat one another equally, above all in the distribution of social goods. This chapter reflects on what equality means; the basis of human equality; why equality matters; what it means to treat one another equally; and equality between persons and groups, including the place of special measures (affirmative action) and measures to redress historical injustices. The proposed resolution for public leadership is to be impartial. This implies equal concern and respect for persons as persons, including the very young, the very old and the profoundly disabled; blocking hegemonic attempts to secure unequal advantage; and open rather than closed impartiality.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • David Bromell
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Governance and Policy StudiesVictoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand

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