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Freedom, Toleration and Respect

  • David Bromell
Chapter

Abstract

In a liberal society, the price we pay to secure our own freedom is relinquishing the power to impose our ideas, beliefs, opinions and values on others. Bromell argues that freedom is not the only value, but it has a very high priority in a pluralist democratic politics. This chapter reflects on what freedom means and why it matters, principles that may justify interfering with others’ freedom, and limits to tolerance. The proposed resolution for public leadership is to be respectful of our own and others’ freedom. This implies opting for governmental intervention as a last resort, not a first resort; seeking opportunities to reduce inequalities and enable the effective freedom of people to lead lives they have reason to value; facilitating citizen participation in self-government; and declining to dominate, threaten or belittle people with whom we do not agree.

Keywords

Freedom Pluralism Democracy Tolerance Public leadership Respect 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Bromell
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Governance and Policy StudiesVictoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand

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