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Religious Advocacy and Activism for the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons

  • Emily WeltyEmail author
  • with Gabrielle Chalk
Chapter

Abstract

Religious leaders can act as norm-builders in global policymaking due to their prominence in civil society and their access to social capital. This role is reflected in the preamble to the 2017 Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which is unique in acknowledging religious leaders in its preamble. The authors argue while the role of religion in international diplomacy is often ignored, the formal recognition of the role of religion in the TPNW reflects a long and ongoing history of faith-based action on nuclear disarmament. The chapter focuses on the role of religious groups in the TPNW’s negotiations, including advocacy with the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize-winning International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), and the diplomatic efforts of the Holy See.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Pace UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Equality NowNew YorkUSA

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