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Organic Flour in France

  • Chloé Juge
  • Elie Langard
  • Mathilde Le Traou
  • Agathe Rival
  • Maëlle Simmen
  • Valentin Bellassen
  • Marion DrutEmail author
  • Matthieu Duboys De Labarre
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, the sustainability of organic products (soft wheat, flour and bread) is compared to that of conventional products in France. The organic supply chain is separated into four levels. Farmers (7328) produce 90,300 tons of soft wheat per year for the milling industry. Forty-eight cooperatives collect half of the grains produced. Millers (93 mills) produce 110,000 tons of flour (from both national wheat production and imports of wheat), which is then used in industrial or traditional bakery (3049 and 1948 employees respectively) to produce bread. The production of organic soft wheat represents 0.26% of the soft wheat production in France. Supply of French organic soft wheat falls short of demand and imports bridge the gap. A major challenge faced by the organic chain is the much lower yields of soft wheat compared to conventional farming. Both these challenges impact the sustainability of the organic supply chain. The results show that the organic chain is globally more sustainable than its reference with regards the economic, social and environmental aspects investigated here. Indeed, results indicate that the organic chain is more profitable at all levels of the value chain and creates more jobs at both farm and processing levels. The organic flour and bread have a lower carbon footprint and travel shorter distances than their reference. Their water footprint is also better on a per hectare basis although the higher yields of conventional wheat reverse this result on a per ton basis.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank all the people who contributed in any way to the development of this report. All the indicator coordinators, Sylvette Monier, Valentin Bellassen, Marion Drut, Antonio Bodini, Mohamed Hilal, Paul Muller and Mario Veneziani, for their work, their availability and their valuable advices.

All the professionals of the supply chain who helped us, for their time and their sympathy. Thank you, in particular, to Julien-Boris Pelletier from Moulin Marion, Raphaël Houlon from Moulin Suire, Loïc Viguier from Moulin Decollogne, Bérangère Mignot from Moulin Nicot, Florence Ethevenot from Dijon Céréales, Clément Divo and Pierre Robin from Chambre d’agriculture de Côte d’Or, Stéphane Grippon and Hélène Levieil from Bio Bourgogne, Laurence Mallet from DRAAF Dijon, Armelle Jaboeuf from France AgriMer, the bakery l’Instant Gourmand, Dijon and Les Champs du Destin, Sacquenay.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chloé Juge
    • 1
  • Elie Langard
    • 1
  • Mathilde Le Traou
    • 1
  • Agathe Rival
    • 1
  • Maëlle Simmen
    • 1
  • Valentin Bellassen
    • 2
  • Marion Drut
    • 2
    Email author
  • Matthieu Duboys De Labarre
    • 2
  1. 1.AgroSup DijonDijonFrance
  2. 2.CESAER, AgroSup Dijon, INRA, Univ. Bourgogne Franche-ComtéDijonFrance

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