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Special Considerations for the Management of Severe Preschool Wheeze

  • Katherine Rivera-SpoljaricEmail author
  • Leonard B. Bacharier
Chapter

Abstract

Preschool wheezing is a common occurrence and is associated with substantial morbidity and health-care utilization. Diagnosis and management are complex by virtue of the broad differential diagnosis and substantial heterogeneity of the presenting phenotypes. Current clinical guidelines for management have been based largely on extrapolated data from older school-age children clinical studies, although recent evidence derived directly from young children has allowed for more evidence-based approaches. The purpose of this chapter is to provide the diagnostic approach to a preschool child that presents with wheezing, review the different presenting phenotypes, and review the available literature for management strategies.

Keywords

Preschool wheezing Atopy Early lung function Genetic predisposition Phenotypes Asthma predictive scores Inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) Leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) Long-acting beta agonist (LABA) severe intermittent wheezing Acute exacerbations Symptom control Response to therapy 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katherine Rivera-Spoljaric
    • 1
    Email author
  • Leonard B. Bacharier
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonary Medicine, Department of PediatricsSt. Louis Children’s Hospital, Washington University School of MedicineSt. LouisUSA

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