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Beginning Anew

  • Nicolas Vandeviver
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines how the Palestinian experience in the aftermath of the Arab-Israeli War of June 1967 informs Beginnings. My analyses show that the work’s method is an empowering form of cultural politics, which Said elaborates by fusing Michel Foucault’s intellectual project with the combined energies of Blackmur, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, and Erich Auerbach, whose philology embodies the theme of the authority of criticism in the double sense of responsibility and intervention. Next, I argue that Said recuperates the first stirrings of Foucault’s antihumanism into a humanistic approach to discourse analysis that safeguards individual agency by defining all writing as the product of an intentional position taken up by its author in relation to a pre-existing discourse; hence opening up the possibility of political intervention.

Keywords

Beginnings Michel Foucault Erich Auerbach Political intervention Philology Discourse 

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicolas Vandeviver
    • 1
  1. 1.Ghent UniversityGentBelgium

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